Author Topic: Jury Selection: Looking Back  (Read 6851 times)

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Offline nomatter_nevermind

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Jury Selection: Looking Back
« on: July 20, 2013, 10:12:38 AM »
USA Today, 7/20/13
Quote
[Robert Hirschhorn] says that he decided months in advance that a panel of women brought the best chance for acquittal.

. . .

Hirschhorn, who was in court every day until the jury was picked, said he was most concerned about two things: guns and honesty. And Juror B-37, the first one to publicly speak in an interview with CNN, was actually Hirschhorn's second favorite choice for the jury because she was a former concealed-weapons permit holder and seemed truthful, he said.

. . .

Hirschhorn's favorite choice for the jury was a black man who was a gun owner who frequently watched FOX News. The state eliminated him.

A spokeswoman for state prosecutors did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

. . .

In Zimmerman's case, Hirschhorn did two rare things: He didn't recommend that the defense lawyers ask for a change of venue and he didn't have the lawyers use all their strikes against jurors.

. . .


"I believed in my heart that an all-female jury was the right jury for George," Hirschhorn said. "My experience has been that women are better at listening than men."

The thinking behind his theory was that women would be less judgemental in a self-defense case where lawyers would be asking them to put themselves in the position Zimmerman found himself when he killed Trayvon.

Hirschhorn also knew he would need to eliminate potential jurors who held anti-gun views and who were not completely honest with their knowledge of the case and the opinions they had formed.

"In the typical high-profile case, jurors have typically formed an opinion against your client," he said, adding that Zimmerman's case was different. "There was a large segment of the community that was against George.There was a large segment of the community that hadn't formed an opinion that George was guilty. The challenge for me was to find those people that can be fair to George."

. . .

Zimmerman defense attorney, Mark O'Mara told Circuit Judge Debra Nelson one older black woman failed to tell the court about a leader of her church being a Trayvon supporter and a younger black woman failed to disclose that she was Facebook friends with a potential witness. The defense also eliminated at least one juror a white man who said he had issues with guns.

Juror B-37, who was the first juror to speak publicly, was Hirschhorn's second favorite and one he thought the state would strike. Hirschhorn thought Juror B-37 was honest, sincere, and thoughtful.

. . .

"[B-37] really did try to do the very best job," Hirschhorn said. "I thought she felt a lot of pain going through all this process."

. . .

After jury selection, Hirschhorn, who considers himself the "seventh juror" of Zimmerman's trial, spoke with Zimmerman's attorneys almost every day during testimony and highlighted for them weaknesses and strengths in their case.

No explanation of why Hirschhorn didn't want to use all the defense's strikes.

Offline RickyJim

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Re: Jury Selection: Looking Back
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2013, 10:33:07 AM »
In another interview he said the strikes were just to get rid of people you really didn't want.  So after he had done that and didn't object to any of the remaining candidates, why use any more?

 

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